Why do marketers love social media?

Here are some of the reasons that came into my head: Shiny new object: It is where the action is today even with the bursting of the Web 2.0 bubble My favorite four letter word: Most of the channels are free (or almost free) Good listeners: There is always someone you can talk with since the conversations are going 24/7 Easy to try: There are low-cost/no-cost ways to test most media Accountable: It is easy to track referrers from these media (Almost) Famous: With so many sites, you can be a legend somewhere (besides your own mind) Branding building: You can enhance your personal brand as you do your day job Accessible tools: A quick trip to Mashable.com shows the hundreds of free, easy-to-use tools to make you look like a social media rockstar. Agile marketing: You don’t need to wait for your agency to make changes to your blog or Facebook page. Why do you use social...

Read More

Audio from my Social Media Breakfast 11 presentation

Here is a recording of my talk at the Boston Social Media Breakfast 11. Special thanks to Adam...

Read More

Social Media Breakfast 11 Boston

I shared learnings about Social Media For Social Change (#SMB11) from real-world experiments at Firstgiving. #SMB11: Social Media For Social Change View more PowerPoint from Frank...

Read More

My Slides for Social Media Breakfast 11 in Cambridge

Yesterday I shared a series of social media experiments we performed last summer at Firstgiving. #SMB11: Social Media For Social Change View SlideShare presentation or Upload your own. (tags: boston...

Read More

Is it Time for a Web 2.0 Bailout?

Now that Washington has bailed out the financial services, insurance and auto industries, isn’t time to rescue the investors in Web 2.0 companies?  Sure they funded businesses with limited (or even no business models) but here is my logic: These companies just need time to be merged with others with more traffic and/or advertising revenue The damage caused by the failure of someone like Twitter could be severe and extremely difficult to contain Pension funds often invest in venture capital funds and we wouldn’t want retirees to be at risk The bailout could be structured as a loan until they can find a deep-pocketed acquirer or revenue model These small business owners shouldn’t be penalized for the predatory lending of a few greedy investors Joe the Tumblr shouldn’t have to pay to share his status updates Americans would face lower incomes, lower home values, higher borrowing costs for housing, education and other living expenses, lower retirement savings, and rising unemployment (OK, that was taken directly from Senate testimony by New York Federal Reserve Bank President Tim Geithner and is not related to this post) If we lose online friendships then the terrorists win (watchout @amandachapel…) There would be chaos on college campuses across the country if students didn’t have a place to share their drunken photos Thousands and thousands and thousands of social media bankruptcies would create as much systemic risk as one Facebook or Myspace faliure My guess is the bailout would cost less than $25 billion over the next five years to keep these companies solvent and Valleywag full of anecdotes about Web 2.0’s young and vapid. I need more content for my impending congressional testimony.  Any suggestions? Disclaimer: This post brought to you in part by @limeduck’s irresponsible use of cough...

Read More

Is the bubble bursting…

Those of you who followed my inane social media journey will recall my predictions about the fate of many of the Web 2.0 bubble companies.  Well, it seems that day of reckoning may be nearing.  You don’t have to look far to find articles about venture capitalists reducing investments or layoffs in the start-up world.  I’m sure we’ll see some high-profile acquisitions over the next quarter or two but I imagine they will be dwarfed by the number of fire sales. Is it time for F’edcompany.com to make its big...

Read More